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New flights to Fuerteventura
Jul 17th, 2014 by elisa

It may have taken a 10 year break, but British Airways is reinstating flights to Fuerteventura from December 2014.

The flights will operate from Gatwick twice a week, all year round and start from 13th December. The route will be operated on Airbus A319 and A320 short-haul aircraft, which the airline announced would be receiving a new look in the cabin, featuring stylish new seats.

British Airways already serves the Canary Islands with flights to Lanzarote leaving twice a week and Tenerife flying seven times a week.

Villaseek has lots of villas in Fuerteventura, but how about checking this lovely two bedroom villa with private hot tub, sun terrace and panoramic view to Lanzarote!

Hot tub

Hot tub

Sun terrace

Sun terrace

Panoramic views

Panoramic views

 

 

 

 

Electronic devices with flat batteries not permitted to fly to US
Jul 9th, 2014 by elisa

Enhanced security checks mean any electronic devices that will not switch on will have to be left behind by passengers travelling to the US.

US homeland security confirmed that these checks would be implemented immediately at some airports abroad as it believes that there is a very real threat of terrorist attacks with the potential for phones to be turned into explosive devices that can avoid detection.

It said passengers at airports which offer direct flights to the US may be forced to switch on their electronic devices to prove to security officials that they do not contain explosives. This comes after it was announced last week that extra security measures would be put in place at airports and on flights due to an increased threat of terrorist activity.

The US Transportation Security Administration warned: “Powerless devices will not be permitted onboard the aircraft. The traveller may also undergo additional screening.”

Conservative MP Sir Malcolm Rifkind warned against complacency on the issue because there are more threats than have been made public. Writing in The Sunday Telegraph, Sir Malcolm said: “It is simply foolish to believe that the threat is either minimal or now behind us.

“We have, indeed, been fortunate but, sadly, this has not been because the terrorists have, since 2005, given up trying to do us harm.”

Security tightened at UK airports
Jul 4th, 2014 by elisa

Security is being tightened at UK airports following fears from the US of increased terrorist threat levels.

The security threat level remains at ‘substantial’, meaning that an attack is a strong possibility. The changes come after the White House voiced fears that terrorists were planning to bring down a plane with help from radicalised European jihadists returning from Syria.

President Barack Obama told American TV news channel ABC: “They’ve got European passports. They don’t need a visa to get into the United States”.

The Department of Transport has issued a statement confirming increased security, but would not provide further information on the details of this.

“We have taken the decision to step up some of our aviation security measures,” it said.

“For obvious reasons we will not be commenting in detail on those changes.”

The majority of passengers should not experience significant disruption, but travellers to the US should arrive earlier to allow for any additional time it takes to get through the extra security checks.

“The safety and security of the public is our paramount concern. The UK has some of the most robust aviation security measures and we will continue to take all the steps necessary to ensure that public safety is maintained,” added the Department of Transport.

The Department of Homeland Security said changes to aviation security in the US would be made in the “upcoming days”. Airlines have responded to say they are ready to bring in any new security measures when instructed.

Six-day French air traffic controllers’ strike
Jun 24th, 2014 by elisa

Delays and cancellations are expected from today as French air traffic controllers begin a six-day strike. 

The strike over budget cuts is not as large as first feared, as one of the two unions that announced the action backed out at the last minute. However, flights to and from France, and also many flights that travel across French airspace will still be cancelled or delayed.

Eurocontrol, a European air safety organisation, estimated almost 14,000 hours of delays over the strike period. A similar walk out last year led to the cancellation of around 1,800 flights a day across Europe.

Ryanair has cancelled 26 flights to and from France, and British Airways has cancelled three return flights from Heathrow to Toulouse, Marseille and Lyon. Easyjet has cancelled 28 flights, but none of these are from UK airports.

Airlines have said that they will update customers daily on further cancellations.

BA said: “The level of disruption is likely to fluctuate in different parts of France at different parts of each day.

“Unfortunately this industrial action is also highly likely to lead to delays on other short-haul services which have to overfly France.”

“We expect to receive information from the French authorities the day before each strike event as to the levels of mandated cancellations for all airlines on each route.

“We aim to publish our revised schedules by 1400 GMT each day for the following day’s flights.”

Advice for travellers affected by the strikes

  • If your airline cancels your flight you are eligible for a refund. You are not, however, eligible for additional compensation from the airline as it is not directly responsible for the cause of cancellation.
  • If you are left stranded abroad (in the EU) as a result of the cancellation of your flight, then the airline are required to pay for accommodation and subsistence until another flight is available to take you home.
  • Travel insurance may pay out small amounts for long delays, but not always for subsequent losses such as hotel bookings. Check your documentation carefully to see what you are entitled to.

A statement on the Easyjet website said: “For cancelled flights, all our customers will be offered a free of charge transfer to a new flight or a full refund.

“We strongly advise customers who wish to travel and want to rebook Easyjet flights to AVOID rebooking flights for any day between 24th-30th June as there is a high likelihood of further disruption that could cause further cancellations.”

Ryanair has urged the French Government and European Union to intervene, calling for the air traffic controllers’ right to strike to be removed and in the meantime to allow neighbouring air traffic providers to keep the skies over France open over the strike period.

Ryanair’s chief marketing officer, Kenny Jacobs said: “It is high time the EU Commission removed these air traffic controllers’ right to strike, in the same way as ATC in the US, and many of Europe’s armies and police forces, are prohibited from striking by law, to stop Europe being held to ransom by a small number of air traffic controllers every summer.”

 

Passport delay? Tourism minister promotes ‘staycation’
Jun 20th, 2014 by elisa

Tourism minister Helen Grant has been criticised for telling Brits affected by the passport processing delays that there’s a lot to be said for the ‘staycation’.

The Maidstone MP told House magazine that she was confident people will get their passports on time, but if they don’t want to go away “we have some fantastic places to visit and holiday not that far from here”.

She then went on to promote sporting events in the UK this year, including the Tour de France Grand Depart, the golf, Commonwealth Games, and the “football that we can watch on the TV”.

Her comments have been defended by her Tory colleagues, saying that as tourism minister, she is right to champion the domestic tourism market, but claim that she was in no way linking it to the passport backlog.

Her words, however, have angered consumer groups and the Public and Commercial Services Union, particularly as she is reportedly planning a holiday abroad in Spain later this year.

Richard Simcox, spokesman for the union commented: “It is incredibly unhelpful while people are desperately trying to get hold of their passports for ministers to be making this sort of glib remark.

“They should be focusing their efforts on sorting out the problem in the Passport Office. It is all very well for her to go off to Spain while suggesting people who can’t get hold of a passport should stay at home.”

Last week we posted advice for anyone urgently waiting for their passports.

Passport processing advice
Jun 11th, 2014 by elisa

Urgent contingency plans have been put in place at the Passport Office to cope with the huge demand in passport applications. 

It has recruited extra staff to operate telephone helplines with extended opening hours from 07:00 to 22:00 weekdays and from 08:00 to 18:00 at weekends. Back office staff have been redeployed to help clear the reported backlog.

Travellers facing an anxious wait for their passports and are due to travel in the next few days are advised to contact the Passport Office directly on 0300 222 00 00. Anyone who applied for a passport by post or the Check & Send service may be able to upgrade to a Premium service.

Standard adult passports cost £72.50 to renew or £81.25 if you use the Post Office’s Passport Check and Send service. Child passports cost £46 or £54.75 respectively.

The premium service costs £128 and means passports can be collected within four hours of being approved. The fast-track service costs £103 with the passport returned within a week of the application being approved.

Passport chief executive Paul Pugh denied a backlog, claiming that 97% of passport renewals and child passports are being processed within the three week turnaround.

“Staff were brought in immediately to respond to the extra demand; we are operating seven days a week and our couriers are delivering passports within 24 hours of being produced.

“We have issued almost three million passports for UK customers in 2014, including over one million issued in the eight weeks since the start of April,” he said.

Mike Jones, of the PCS union, told the BBC: “Thousands of people complain that it has taken more than two months for them to get passports. That clearly is a backlog.”

 

Passport delays threaten summer travel
Jun 9th, 2014 by elisa

Thousands of holidaymakers could miss out on their summer holidays because delays at the Passport Office mean they won’t receive their passports on time. 

The Telegraph reports that some new applications are taking as much as two months to process, leading to fears that the backlog could worsen as the holiday season approaches.

According to some estimates, the backlog has already reached half a million and staff from other departments have now been drafted in to help cope with demand. Unions claim that staff are being forced to “paper over the cracks” by working overtime, and they may be forced to take industrial action unless urgent measures are taken to improve the situation.

Labour’s shadow immigration minister, David Hanson, said the party’s MPs have been “inundated” with complaints from constituents struggling to get their passports in time for holidays, despite applying three weeks in advance as recommended. Mr Hanson said 75 Labour MPs had reported more than 370 complaints, the majority concerning the office in Durham, which processes passport applications for children and people who have changed their names.

A spokesman for the Public and Commercial Services Union said staff are frustrated that they’re unable to provide the level of service that the public expects from the passport office.

The Passport Office denies the extent of the backlog, claiming 97% of straightforward renewals and child applications are being processed in the three week turnaround. It puts the “exceptional early summer demand” down to the improving economy and a rise in holiday bookings.

The guidance on turnaround times are three weeks for straightforward renewals and child passports and six weeks for new adult passports.

World Cup fans could spend £5,000 phoning home
Jun 3rd, 2014 by elisa

Phone charges abroad can be a tricky issue, particularly when you’re on a contract, where your phone bill for calling home could skyrocket with roaming charges before you know it. 

Today’s Metro newspaper reports that England football fans visiting Brazil for the World Cup could end up with around £5,000 mobile phone bills due to the uncapped roaming charges in the host country.

Price comparison website, uSwitch.com is warning fans that they could be charged £465 a day because the charges are uncapped, plus they could spend £22 for a five minute phone call or to send 10 texts back home.

“Data caps that most networks will automatically opt customers into are very easy to opt out of by text – and it can be tempting to do so, particularly if footie fans get carried away by World Cup fever and want to send a picture message via Whatsapp or Skype friends and family from the stadium,” said uSwitch.com’s Ernest Doku.

Dataroam.co.uk offers a special Brazil data SIM card to avoid the expensive data charges with 30 day packages starting at £59.99.

If you have a smartphone it is probably wise to turn off the data roaming option on your phone all together, only switching it on when you really need it. Contacting your network provider to check costs before you go away, and if there are any special international data/call bundles would be wise; plus consider using a local SIM card to make cheaper calls to your fellow fans while in Brazil.

CAA suggests “noise tax”
Jun 2nd, 2014 by elisa

The Civil Aviation Authority is proposing a new “noise tax” similar to The Tax on Air Transport Noise introduced in France in 2005, reports the Telegraph. 

In its recently published Managing Aviation Noise report, the CAA proposed measures aimed at reducing noise from aircraft taking off and landing at airports in the UK, and compensating those living nearby.

The CAA said the tax would be a ‘last resort’, but if implemented it would penalise flights according to how much noise pollution they cause, with proceeds going towards paying for insulation in communities near airports. It could adopt a similar system to that in France whereby airlines are taxed depending on the number of people affected, the aircraft’s weight at takeoff, and the noise rating and time of day.

The report said: “If other measures do not go far enough to engage the aviation industry in the effort to manage noise, policymakers could consider a further incentive applied with the introduction of a noise tax.”

Virgin Galactic clear for take off
Jun 2nd, 2014 by elisa

We’re tantalisingly close to seeing commercial space flights as Virgin Galactic has been given Federal Aviation Administration approval to launch its services.

The first flight won’t be until the end of this year, but in comparison to how long we’ve been waiting for this development, it’s hardly any time to wait! Around 600 people have already reserved their $250,000 seats for the zero gravity flights on SpaceShipTwo.

“Our team is working hard to begin routine and affordable space launches from Spaceport America and this agreement brings us another step closer to that goal,” said Virgin Galactic CEO George Whitesides.

The FAA agreement outlines how the Virgin Galactic Spaceport America base in New Mexico will coordinate with normal air traffic control systems. It also has a similar agreement for the state of California where it recently completed a third successful test flight over the Mojave Desert.

Branson has previously said he and his family will be on Virgin’s first space flight.

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